Saturday, October 13, 2007

Peace and Global Warming

Critics raises question: what Nobel Peace prize has commonality with Global Warming? The answer from Nobel committee was profound:
"climate change, if unchecked, could unleash massive migrations, violent competitions for resources and, ultimately, threaten the “security of mankind.”"
Al Gore's sharing the Nobel Peace prize with United Nations' Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change can be seen by the "skeptics" as the slap on Mr. Bush's face, but, the clear and present danger from global warming, its far reaching disastrous impacts for the entire globe is above and beyond the mere slap on petty science deniers.

Mr. Bush's last seven years have seen the "questioning the science of global warming and undermining efforts to do anything substantive about it. His recent efforts to demonstrate leadership -- from finally recognizing global warming as real to hosting a climate summit with the major emitters of greenhouse gases -- are undermined by his insistence that nations pursue voluntary "aspirational goals" to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. This is not the kind of leadership the world is looking for."

What the world is looking for is someone who is not a fear-monger for fictitiously created enemies for the reason of political expediencies. Al Gore like his predecessor Jimmy Carter, in more likelihood, is in a grandiose zenith of their career, from which urgent and practical solutions to the real threats that our world is facing may be coordinated and inspired.

All the talks on media on Gore's possible return to Presidential politics was termed by Bob Herbert of New York Times as: "like asking someone who’s recovered from a heart attack if he plans to resume smoking", considering that Gore "knows better than anyone else how toxic and downright idiotic presidential politics has become."

Here is a quote from Bob Herbert's today's article:
Mr. Gore knows the system is in trouble, and not just because of the way he lost in 2000. The last time I spoke to him, a few months ago, he said: “Having served in the White House with the Gingrich Congress, and having watched the best of intentions so often turned into small changes ballyhooed as revolutionary, sometimes having no lasting mark, I really do believe that fixing the dynamic of democracy is an urgent task.”
Gore and Carter have already transcended from politics' shadowy land into broader, more intellectually honest arena of global proportionality (though there are skeptics), where their world wide name and fame recognitions can do helluva good for the distressed many.

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